Blog

WaysFinding - Enabling coherent explore spaces

Image by EvGenIt, Pixabay
I have written before about the need to embrace messy coherence or in more technical terms, coherent heterogeneity, a term I first encountered in the work of Dave Snowden. While most intuitively understand this need, how to achieve it practically remains elusive. We are emerging from a time where alignment and efficiency were pursued like […]
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Rhythm, ritual and boundaries

  “When patterns are broken, new worlds emerge.” ― Tuli Kupferberg A few weeks ago, I wrote about what I experienced as the “strange in-between”, knowing that everything has changed, but still feeling as if nothing has changed. So much has changed since then. As we enter our third week of lockdown here in South […]
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Facing the scary (but exciting) boundary between competence and incompetence

“This is not just an era of change; it is increasingly a change of era.” y General Sir Nick Carter, head of the British Arm I tend to avoid using the term VUCA; it has become overused (particularly by consultants) and increasingly is ‘just another buzz word’. It is, however, interesting to reflect on why […]
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Navigate Complexity: Three Habits of Mind

Too much of our understanding of complexity is intellectual. There is very little that embodies what complexity philosopher Edgar Morin would term “lived complexity”.
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Reconceptualising organisations: from complicated machines to flowing streams.

Too often we still view organisations through a mechanistic lens and this impacts on the flows we pay attention to. If we see them instead as living systems, organisms or ecosystems, it soon becomes clear that flow is central to every aspect of the organisation.
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7 lessons I've learnt consulting as a "complexity practitioner"

I've now been using a complex and emergent approach to consulting for around 17 years.  A friend of mine read me his coaching "manifesto" recently including his approach to internal change consulting.  It made me think about what I've learnt about using this approach so I decided it might be useful to reflect on them […]
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7 Differences between complex and complicated

Decision-makers commonly mistake complex systems for simply complicated ones and look for solutions without realizing that ‘learning to dance’ with a complex system is definitely different from ‘solving’ the problems arising from it. – Roberto Poli Many people believe that complexity is just higher order complicatedness i.e. that there is a continuum and that the difference […]
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All that jazz ... making coherence coherent

One of the assertions I make quite often nowadays, is that we need to move from focusing on alignment, to focusing on coherence.  I've found it interesting that out of all the potentially controversial statements I make, this one seems to generate an inordinate amount of questions and disagreement.  It is understandable as this notion […]
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Why we suck at "solving wicked problems"

Problems: Wicked, complex, intractable, or adaptive  … whatever we choose to call them, we seem to suck at solving them and we often get profoundly overwhelmed and stuck.  I believe the reason for this is hidden in the language I used in the title and previous sentence  (… and no it's not the adjectives ... […]
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The peripheral; extravagance; and paradox: Whistler reflections by Renée Koch

I asked my friend Renée Koch, who was a faculty member at the Whistler Retreat earlier this year, to contribute a guest blog reflecting on her experience and learning at the retreat and beyond.  I love her focus on the peripheral; extravagance; and paradox.   What struck me is how the notion of extravagance again challenges […]
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How organisational OCD is stamping out innovation and agility

Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a debilitating anxiety disorder that can have devastating consequences for the individual that suffers from it. I think there is a similar disorder that organisations suffer from ... I call it Obsessive Certainty Disorder.  It too is linked with anxiety and the need for control.   And it too has devastating consequences, […]
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8 guidelines to enable organisational fluidity

While preparing for my recent keynote at Agile Africa, I came across the work of Prof Adrian Bejan, a mechanical engineer who contributed to the field of thermodynamics through his constructal law, which is formulated as follows: “For a finite-size system to persist in time (to live), it must evolve in such a way that […]
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Ten things to keep in mind when facilitating an emergent process

"Traveler, there is no path. The path is made by walking. Traveller, the path is your tracks And nothing more. Traveller, there is no path The path is made by walking. By walking you make a path And turning, you look back At a way you will never tread again Traveller, there is no road […]
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Learnings from Whistler: Scaffolding emergence

In June this year I had the privilege of attending the Cynefin Retreat in Whistler, Canada along with many Cynefin practitioners that up to then, I only knew virtually.  The opportunity to finally meet in person was incentive enough to attend, however even that couldn’t compete with the stimulating ideas we engaged with over the […]
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Two Sensemaker® projects to understand opposites on the generational spectrum

More Beyond is partnering with KLA on two open Sensemaker® based research projects to understand how South Africans on opposite ends of the generational spectrum view the future. The first project was done in partnership with The Refirement Network and seeks to understand how South Africans over 45 think about their next season.  We are […]
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Enabling adaptive space

I had the privilege this week to co-facilitate an Adaptive Space workshop with Prof Mary Uhl-Bien at a local business school. I’ve long been intrigued by her work, so it was really good to see it applied practically. As always, I’m left with a need to make sense of where it fits into other complexity […]
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Is faster always better? The case for a certain slowness

In the so-called VUCA world where greater agility seems to have be the only response, this is an important question. Even though agility is about much more than speed, the first response I often get when I ask leaders why they’ve embarked on so-called Agile Transformation processes is “we need to be faster”. The maturity […]
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Seven implications of complexity for organisations

My last post was about Paul Cilliers's 7 characteristics of complex systems.  In this post I want to explore 7 of the implications of complexity that he thought was important for those working in and on organisations  (his original text is in italics). 1.Since the nature of a complex organization is determined by the interaction […]
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7 Characteristics of complex systems

I have been re-reading the work of Prof Paul Cilliers, who truly was a pioneer in complexity thinking.  I came across this summary of the general characteristics of complex systems in a piece he wrote in 2000.  It is a concise and accessible qualitative description of complexity and I thought it would be useful to […]
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Recent Sensemaker project roundup

Over the last year we've had the opportunity to do a couple of really interesting Sensemaker projects.  For those who are interested in South African cases, here's a summary: Financial services: We have gotten a lot of traction in the customer insights space, specfically in the financial services industry.  This industry operates in a very […]
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3 pieces of advice for leading a system turn around (especially for our new SA President)

“We incline to see history through the lives of great men. That inclination blinds us to the real complexity …”  - John Kay,  Obliquity Ever since his election as South Africa's new president, my news feed has been filled with posts from people telling Cyril Ramaphosa what his priorities should be.  He faces a seemingly […]
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Dave Snowden at TedX: A succinct overview of his groundbreaking work

Dave at TedX
I first met Dave in 2002 when we were both employed by IBM.  I remember experiencing an immediate resonance with his work, especially the inherent integrity of honoring context and not mindlessly applying best-practice recipes as the big consultancies tend to do. It is now 16 years later, and it has been a privilege to […]
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What Van Gogh & Cape Town's water crisis can teach us about innovation

Most people believe that innovation requires creativity, and therefore that creativity is a pre-condition for innovation.  This has somewhat "mystified" innovation and sparked entire industries focused on creativity training, design thinking courses and all manner of "creative disruption" processes to help people "think outside the box" in an attempt to unleash the latent creative genius […]
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Levers, blueprints and roadmaps: 3 tips to combat "dark" metaphors

For those who follow me, it’s probably become apparent that I have a love for metaphors and analogies. Because much of what I do involves introducing others to new concepts, I find them to be useful “hooks”, linking the new idea to something familiar, thereby providing a “scaffold of mind” while understanding grows. Because of this, […]
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7 principles to help organisations resist the siren song of copying recipes

“You can't replicate the end point of an evolutionary process, which by its success has changed the context anyway.  However we can seek to copy the starting conditions and enable the emergence of new contextually unique successes that learn from it.” - Dave Snowden “… the fact is, if you don't know what makes things […]
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Befriending uncertainty

Having just returned from one journey into the unknown (visiting Sweden for the first time), I am preparing to enter the unknown once again as I pack for a residential Tavistock working conference that starts today.  Having been through this experience before, I am torn between excitement about what I will learn, and a profound sense […]
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Using Cynefin to make sense of preparing for the future of work

These past two weeks, I've had several conversations with executives and OD/L&D professionals who are trying to make sense of the complexities that automation initiatives are introducing into the workplace. We found it helpful to use Cynefin to understand some of these dynamics.  Now we know things tend not to fit neatly into the domains, […]
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Want resilience? Nurture diversity.

One of the learnings from complexity that I find particularly valuable in the workplace is the need for a “requisite diversity”.   Too little diversity limits the system’s adaptive capacity and too much diversity leads to a loss of coherence. One way to look at this is the tension between efficiency and centralisation e.g. instead […]
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Coaching leaders in the networked economy: reflecting on learnings from the A-N coaching course (LOL 1)

When you’re at sea and need to find your way, it is key to first locate yourself i.e. know your current position.  Before we had GPS, mariners did this by getting a “fix” - taking a compass heading on three widely spaced objects and determining where these headings intersect to get a “fix” on their […]
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Finding our way together

In a recent post, Jeff Goins describes that moment when the so-called “imposter syndrome” prevents a writer from publishing his work.  I could relate to that feeling … I often find myself agonising about whether or not something I’ve written is “worthy of publishing”.   Typically it sounds like “Who am I to write about this? I’m […]
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Walking with the elephants

Today I want to share one of my favorite analogies.  I use this in almost every presentation as a way to challenge the prevailing paradigm that priveleges expert design and control. There are two ways to lay out a park … ... one is to employ an expert landscape architect to design an ideal layout […]
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Think like a Chef

The trouble is that, in my view, the continual bombardment of quick and simple recipes is doing nothing to teach us how to cook. We are in serious danger of becoming slaves to recipes, rather than having the confidence to be able to walk along a supermarket aisle, or look through fridge and cupboard, to […]
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Metaphorology

I have always loved metaphors and analogies. Stumbling upon a really great metaphor always feels like discovering hidden treasure (see what I did there?... :-)) Metaphors are pervasive Research says that we use 6 metaphors a minute (!) - at first this seems impossible, but once we tune into metaphors, it soon becomes apparent just […]
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Storyscaping culture

“The temptation to lead as a chess master, controlling each move of the organization, must give way to an approach as a gardener, enabling rather than directing. A gardening approach to leadership is anything but passive. The leader acts as an “Eyes-On, Hands-Off” enabler who creates and maintains an ecosystem in which the organization operates.” ―  […]
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If you want to innovate, don't say so

"Innovation is not so much about having ideas as it is about making connections" Harold Jarche Last week I had the opportunity to facilitate a week-long "innovation sprint" for Agile 42, an international agile coaching company.  After recovering from my time spent facilitating 39 other facilitators (on my own!) I finally had time to reflect on […]
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Video: Evolving Cynefin Shadow Domains and constraints typology

I recently had the privilege of listening to Dave Snowden give a short explanation of the evolving Cynefin constraints typology and new shadow domains.  I find the shadow domains helpful when thinking of interventions - specifically in combination with/in place of the subdomain models. This is still emerging, so expect these to change ...
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The complexities of Responsible Leadership

Earlier in the week, I had the privilege of spending the morning exploring ideas around complexity and leadership with two friends who understand both fields.  Our conversation mostly centered on Responsible Leadership as one of the participants runs the Albert Luthuli Centre for Responsible Leadership and it's a very relevant topic at the moment.  At Davos […]
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Avoiding incorrect expectations: positioning Sensemaker®

As the Sensemaker® approach gains traction in the market, more and more people are attempting to convince others to use it.  So whether you are trying to sell it internally (e.g.  to  your insights team) or to a client, here are a few tips to ensure that it is positioned properly (especially in relation to other […]
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On mayonnaise and survival

Mayonnaise
I recently attended the 4th International Conference for Responsible Leadership, hosted at Gibs by the Albert Luthuli Centre for Responsible Leadership (University of Pretoria).  One of the highlights was getting the chance to facilitate a panel discussion on Complexity Leadership in South Africa with a group of highly respected local and international academics. Another was […]
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A short chronicle of 2016

I always admire those writers who have the discipline to publish consistently regardless of circumstance. I tend to write in spurts. I find that when I become really busy with projects and speaking engagements, my writing suffers. So in case you were wondering why I've been so quiet, I thought I'd write a short update […]
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Three lessons from a marshmallow

It's amazing how much one can learn from a simple game using a marshmallow and some spaghetti.  I first came across the so-called Marshmallow challenge when I discovered Tom Wujec's Ted talk.  I later also found his site where he generously shares detailed step-by-step instructions as well as presentations one can use as facilitation aids. In short, small groups […]
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Jungle vs Zoo - Reflections on change and resilience

In my previous post I introduced the analogy of a jungle vs a zoo to help us make sense of the complex contexts we face and the often ordered organisational structures and processes we tend to create.  In this post I want to explore this analogy further and look specifically at how change and resilience from the […]
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It's hard to survive in the jungle if all you know is the zoo

I recently posted a tweet that created an unexpected enthusiastic response. It read: “It’s hard to survive in the jungle if you were trained in a zoo” I love using metaphors and analogies to explain the concepts I work with, like the difference between complex (jungle) and complicated or obvious (zoo) contexts. This is one […]
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What I learned from speaking at TedX

Last year, while browsing my LinkedIn feed I came across TedX Pretoria's call for speakers.  On the spur of the moment, I decided to nominate myself, never really considering the consequences if I was actually accepted.  A couple of weeks later I received the email that my nomination had been successful, and promptly had a "what were you […]
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Reflections on consulting

In a recent Acumen (GIBS Business School's magazine) there was a pretty scathing piece on consulting with the heading: Consultants or Insultants? The author's basic premise is that aside from a limited number of tech projects, no self-respecting executive can ever justify the use of expensive consultants and that more often than not they only […]
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Enabling agility: reflecting on the role of heuristics

I've been doing a lot of work lately working with organisations to build strategic agility and resilience to continuous change.  This has caused much reflection on what potential enablers might be for strategic agility and distributed decision-making in this increasingly complex and volatile world.  I've come to believe that one of the key enablers is an  understanding of […]
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Enabling (vs mandating) change

One of the intractable problems that seem face most companies is effecting real and lasting change across the entire organisation.  Many organisations are littered with failed change initiatives and more and more it seems that traditional change management methodologies are failing.  Most large organisations seem to be profoundly stuck when it comes to enabling change; plagued with stories […]
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The story of SenseMaker® in UNDP Eastern Europe and CIS

A very useful blog by Tony Quinlan posted on the Cognitive Edge site.  The real value is in following the links and reading about the various UNDP Sensemaker® sites. The story of SenseMaker® in UNDP Eastern Europe and CIS.
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Believing you're in chaos can become a self-fullfilling prophecy

One of my new favorite things to do is facilitating Cynefin 101 workshops within my corporate clients.  It allows me to be quite provocative and disruptive (which I've started enjoying of late), and I love seeing "the lights come on" when people get it.  The interactions between attendees can also be pretty illuminating.  A week or […]
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Connectivity or coupling: keep Goldilocks in mind (Building resilience: Principle 2)

My mother always said that nothing with a "too" in front of it is good.  That is certainly true about connectivity, too little and too much can be equally detrimental.  High levels of connectivity can facilitate the fast recovery of a system after a disruption, but at the same time some disruptions spread faster in highly […]
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Maintain diversity and redundancy (Building resilience: Principle 1)

"Systems with many different components (e.g. species, actors, or sources of knowledge) are generally more resilient than systems with few components.  Redundancy provides 'insurance' within a system by allowing some components to compensate for the loss or failure of others.  Redundancy is even more valuable if the components providing the redundancy also react differently to […]
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Building resilience: what organisations can learn from social ecologists

I have been blessed with a very diverse network, which includes among others many renowned thinkers and scientists in the field of social-ecological systems.  I am therefore exposed to thinking that I would otherwise not gain easy access to.  Most of my work happens in the corporate world (although I do get to play with scientists […]
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What I believe to be true about organisational culture

A client asked me to write down some thoughts about a complexity based approach to culture.  I thought I'd go ahead and publish some of my initial thoughts here as well. (I've woven together my own ideas with those of Dave Snowden & Dr Chene Swart - so much credit to them!) Thinking about culture from a […]
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Reflections on the 'edginess' of change

I was part of a "real play" scenario (you play yourself i.e. how would you respond in the scenario, vs playing a role) the other day, to demonstrate a wonderful coaching modality called ORSC.  The scenario we were playing out was one of a large and established insurer who had aquired a small, agile and innovative […]
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Useful: Dave Snowden on resilience

  While preparing a proposal for a series of leadership workshops on resilience, I came across this list of seven characteristics of resilience in an older post by Dave Snowden: They've probably changed, but I thought they were useful nonetheless.  Original text in italics. For a system to be resilient it must be capable of dynamic re-organisation […]
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Complexity, snake-oil and silver bullets

I just returned from a trip to London to experience the updated 4-day Cognitive Edge accreditation training and to meet some of the CE'rs I've known virtually for many years (like Michael Cheveldave and Peter Stanbridge) face to face.  Several new ideas were introduced, probably the biggest one being the renaming of the simple domain of […]
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The soft stuff has become the hard stuff

The Gallup State of the Global Workplace report was released recently, containing employee engagement results per country.  The results are generally pretty dismal,  an indictment on the prevailing cultures in our organisations. For sub-Saharan Africa, the report states: In most sub-Saharan African countries, formal employment for an employer is still relatively rare; many residents work at subsistence […]
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Regime Shifts: a new way to think about culture change?

Towards the end of last year I attended a Complexity Forum hosted by the Center for Studies in Complexity in Stellenbosch. There were academics, researchers and practitioners from many different disciplines, and it was fascinating to hear so many different perspectives on complexity.  A dominant theme that emerged was around the concept of resilience.  It […]
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Building the adaptive core of your organisation

A discourse that has been gaining prominence in business nowadays is around adaptive and resilient organisations.  Some of the world's leading business thinkers like Prof Gary Hamel are making the case for adaptive capacity as being critical for businesses today.  In this HBR article the authors speak of Adaptive Advantage as the new competitive edge.   Similarly, resilience has been […]
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Workshops with Prof Dave Snowden in Jhb & Cape Town (October 2013)

As promised in an earlier post, here are the details for the various public workshops taking place with Dave Snowden in October. In Gauteng: 1.  A full day workshop at Worldsview Academy in Johannesburg on 17 October with a focus on complexity & leadership Find out more about it here 2.  A half day workshop at […]
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One sure-fire way to poison your culture

Sometimes I come across ideas in business that is just so counter-productive that I really cannot understand how they ever became accepted practice.  One such idea that I've seen wreak havoc on corporate culture is the so-called Forced Ranking performance assessment process (or as Jack Welch termed it "Rank & Yank"). In virtually every company […]
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Stories can change our brain chemistry

"Stories are powerful because they transport us into other people’s worlds, but in doing that, they change the way our brains work and potentially change our brain chemistry; and that’s what it means to be a social creature." - Paul Zak I find the research described in this  short video by neuroeconomics pioneer Paul Zak,  author […]
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A great story needn't be long

People often think that a story has to be long  and follow a particular structure in order to have impact or be memorable.  This belief often inhibits us from sharing our stories, but it is simply not true.  Sometimes, the best stories are really short little anecdotes.  I came across this one in a recent […]
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Complexity, Modeling & Natural Resource Management

With the publication of our article on Complexity, Modeling & Natural Resource Management in the Ecology & Society journal, a process that started in 2011 has finally been concluded.  As mentioned in a previous post, I was one of two complexity practitioners who co-authored two academic papers with some of the leading academic thinkers in […]
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Don't allow others (or yourself) to should on you!

I've been reflecting on how often we allow other people's (and society in general's) 'shoulds' to influence our choices and even our identity.  Now I have to say up-front, some 'shoulds' are legitimate, for example, everyone should respect life and not go around murdering other people, and it's probably best not to cheat on your […]
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The restorative power of meaning

In an article in the Time magazine (26 June ed), Joe Klein writes poignantly about how regaining a sense of purpose through public service is helping US military veterans and returning troops to find their way again.  Some of these men and women suffer from severe PTSD, others are simply struggling to cope with the […]
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Fostering complexity thinking

I am really excited that after a long and pretty tedious process two peer reviewed articles I co-authored with a bunch of heavy-weight academics have finally been published.  Both articles form part of a special feature on Applied Research for Enhancing Human Well-Being and Environmental Stewardship: Using Complexity Thinking in Southern Africa. The academic publication process […]
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The tyranny of the moment

  Warning!  This post doesn't contain 7 steps or 12 ideas, nor is it the ideal 600-800 word length ... "The greatest tragedy in using speed as the answer to complexity and the complexities of work-life, is that very soon we cannot recognize anything that is not traveling at the same velocity as we are. We […]
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Are we slaves to speed?

An Excerpt from Crossing the Unknown Sea: Work as a Pilgrimage of Identity by David Whyte David Whyte describes his book as, "a midnight conversation" on the union of work and soul, yearning and satisfaction.  I love this reflection on speed and how it can keep us from the deepest parts of ourselves "Speed in work has […]
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Has management become a dirty word?

I had an interesting conversation with a friend of mine yesterday about the perspective that "everyone is a leader" and what that says about management.  The debate around the difference between management and leadership is certainly not a new one, and it seems that everyone has a different definition for each of these concepts.  It […]
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Metaphors shape our language

  More and more academic research is being done on metaphors - they are no longer considered a "rhetorical flourish" found in literary texts. Rather, linguists have shown that metaphor is a pervasive phenomenon in everyday language, a major force in the development of new word meanings, and the source of at least some grammatical […]
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Leadership is about climate control, not command and control

  In a new TED talk by Sir Ken Robinson (embedded below) he focuses on prevailing education systems and how they stifle learning and creativity.  He eloquently makes the case that education is not a mechanistic endeavor that is about conformity and compliance, but an inherently human and organic process that is about valuing diversity […]
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Work and meaning

In The Upside of Irrationality, Dan Ariely reflects on work and meaning.  Can human beings find satisfaction and be engaged in work that pays well, but offers no meaning? He defines two "types" of meaning: "m"eaning - a feeling of being challenged by our work, and completing it to our own satisfaction vs "M"eaning - a hope […]
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A great metaphor for teamwork from Steve Jobs

In the same "lost" Steve Jobs interview I blogged about last week, he shares this anecdote as a metaphor for team work. "When I was a young kid there was a widowed man who lived up the street. He was in his eighties. He’s a little scary looking. And I got to know him a […]
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Why it's not a bad idea to become a better storyteller

When I think about my favorite teachers and speakers I can't think of one that doesn't use stories to make their subject "come alive".  I think most people feel this way, and this has spawned countless 'become a better storyteller' workshops.  While I'm not a big fan of many of these interventions (although there are […]
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A monster that devours itself: a capitalist's parable?

Erisychton (Er-is-ya-thon), according to Ovid's tales from Greek mythology was a wealthy timber merchant and Thessalian King.  He was a greedy man who thought only about profit.  To him, nothing was sacred.  The goddess Demeter had a sacred grove with a special tree beloved by the gods.  Prayers of the faithful were tied to the […]
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7 Lessons on innovation from the "lost" Steve Jobs interview

I may a bit behind the rest of the world, but I only recently came across this video of an interview done with Steve Jobs by Bob Cringely as part of the 1996 PBS documentary  Triumph of the Nerds: The Rise of Accidental Empires.  The footage was presumed lost for several years, but recently a […]
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Courage

“The original definition of ‘courage’ . . . is from the Latin word ‘cor,’ meaning ‘heart.’ And the original definition was to tell the story of who you are with your whole heart. And so these folks had, very simply, the courage to be imperfect. They had the compassion to be kind to themselves first, and then to others, because, as it turns out, we can’t […]
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One article: 3 powerful metaphor applications

Author and Time senior editor Jeffrey Kluger has certainly mastered the use of metaphor in his writing.  In a recent article published on Time.com he reflects on the reasons why human beings risk their lives to help others and how, in the wake of the horrific Boston bombings, good and evil once again stand in stark contrast […]
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If you think your people are motivated by money, you are wrong!

What really motivates us in life and work?  Most companies and leaders seem to believe that money is the main thing that motivates people to give their best.  Research is proving that assumption to be incorrect. In a recent HBR post, Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic cites several research studies that proved that there is a very low […]
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Boundaries: 9 practices to help you find your NO!

  In my work as a coach and consultant, an issue that I frequently encounter is an inability to set and maintain healthy boundaries.  One manifestation of this is over-burdened people living out-of-control lives due to an inability to say no.  It's not really surprising, seeing as most of us were raised in a culture […]
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Have you got your SCARF on?

Why is change so hard?  It's the one constant in life - we all know that change is inevitable.  We grow older with each passing second, we observe the changing seasons ... and then there is technology: the moment you buy your new gadget there's already a bigger and faster one in the pipeline.  Yet […]
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We get the culture we deserve

Culture is the lifeblood of an organization.  People often think that a culture can be designed or engineered, and this is true to an extent, but in reality culture is an emergent property of the people, policies and practices within an organisation.  A human system  and it's culture co-evolves; whether in a company, a family, […]
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Why another blog?

Although I've been actively blogging on www.narrativelab.co.za for several years, I've never felt the need for a personal blog.  Now that I have decided to spread my wings and explore the world beyond TNL, I find that I have quite a bit to say.  I've been a business consultant now for for more than 12 […]
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@more_beyond
  • There are very few things that I find as soul-rejuvenating as the ocean.  Got to spend an hour on the beach yesterday between talks. Such a blessing!

#oceanlover #beachlife #capetownsouthafrica #rejuvenation #photography #iphonephotography
  • Traveler, 
your footprints re the path 
and nothing more;

Traveler, there is no path, 
the path is made by walking.
By walking the path is made 
and when you look back
you’ll see a road
never to be trodden again.

Traveler, there is no path, 
only trails across the sea...

Antonio Machado

To me, this poem perfectly articulates where we are today - in uncharted territory, needing to make new paths that can lead us to different futures we cannot fully envision now.

We are all wayfinders now …

#complexity #wayfinding #explorer #futureready #complexityfit #thriveinuncertainty #poetry #morebeyond
  • When this is the ‘bathroom reading’, you know you’re in a good place! #poetry #goodtaste
  • Beautiful Hout Bay Harbour. Just what I needed to clear my head after a full day’s facilitation. 
#replenish #vitaminsea #houtbay #capetown
  • Preparing for the first in-person talk in a while. beCOOL in complexity.  Interesting how much easier it has become to talk to executives about #complexity. The 2020’s have given us all a masterclass.
  • Earlier this year we visited the Kruger Park for our wedding anniversary. Over the years we have been pretty lucky with wildlife sightings - we once saw the big 5 on our first day! This weekend was another story. We didn’t spot any big cats - disappointing as seeing leopard in particular is always magical. 

Had we fixated on what we “should” have seen, our disappointment could have ruined the whole weekend.  We would have missed experiencing other unexpected little joys like this tiny tiny (size of my thumb) baby bird. 

I wrote this post reflecting on the difference between expectations and living with a sense or expectancy …escaping the tyranny of our ‘shoulds’ and our attachment to particular outcomes. 

https://link.medium.com/O0U76WQRVlb

#nonattachment #bepresent #tinywow #expectancy #complexityfitness
There are very few things that I find as soul-rejuvenating as the ocean.  Got to spend an hour on the beach yesterday between talks. Such a blessing!

#oceanlover #beachlife #capetownsouthafrica #rejuvenation #photography #iphonephotography
There are very few things that I find as soul-rejuvenating as the ocean. Got to spend an hour on the beach yesterday between talks. Such a blessing! #oceanlover #beachlife #capetownsouthafrica #rejuvenation #photography #iphonephotography
2 years ago
View on Instagram |
1/6
Traveler, 
your footprints re the path 
and nothing more;

Traveler, there is no path, 
the path is made by walking.
By walking the path is made 
and when you look back
you’ll see a road
never to be trodden again.

Traveler, there is no path, 
only trails across the sea...

Antonio Machado

To me, this poem perfectly articulates where we are today - in uncharted territory, needing to make new paths that can lead us to different futures we cannot fully envision now.

We are all wayfinders now …

#complexity #wayfinding #explorer #futureready #complexityfit #thriveinuncertainty #poetry #morebeyond
Traveler, your footprints re the path and nothing more; Traveler, there is no path, the path is made by walking. By walking the path is made and when you look back you’ll see a road never to be trodden again. Traveler, there is no path, only trails across the sea... Antonio Machado To me, this poem perfectly articulates where we are today - in uncharted territory, needing to make new paths that can lead us to different futures we cannot fully envision now. We are all wayfinders now … #complexity #wayfinding #explorer #futureready #complexityfit #thriveinuncertainty #poetry #morebeyond
2 years ago
View on Instagram |
2/6
When this is the ‘bathroom reading’, you know you’re in a good place! #poetry #goodtaste
When this is the ‘bathroom reading’, you know you’re in a good place! #poetry #goodtaste
2 years ago
View on Instagram |
3/6
Beautiful Hout Bay Harbour. Just what I needed to clear my head after a full day’s facilitation. 
#replenish #vitaminsea #houtbay #capetown
Beautiful Hout Bay Harbour. Just what I needed to clear my head after a full day’s facilitation. #replenish #vitaminsea #houtbay #capetown
2 years ago
View on Instagram |
4/6
Preparing for the first in-person talk in a while. beCOOL in complexity.  Interesting how much easier it has become to talk to executives about #complexity. The 2020’s have given us all a masterclass.
Preparing for the first in-person talk in a while. beCOOL in complexity. Interesting how much easier it has become to talk to executives about #complexity. The 2020’s have given us all a masterclass.
2 years ago
View on Instagram |
5/6
Earlier this year we visited the Kruger Park for our wedding anniversary. Over the years we have been pretty lucky with wildlife sightings - we once saw the big 5 on our first day! This weekend was another story. We didn’t spot any big cats - disappointing as seeing leopard in particular is always magical. 

Had we fixated on what we “should” have seen, our disappointment could have ruined the whole weekend.  We would have missed experiencing other unexpected little joys like this tiny tiny (size of my thumb) baby bird. 

I wrote this post reflecting on the difference between expectations and living with a sense or expectancy …escaping the tyranny of our ‘shoulds’ and our attachment to particular outcomes. 

https://link.medium.com/O0U76WQRVlb

#nonattachment #bepresent #tinywow #expectancy #complexityfitness
Earlier this year we visited the Kruger Park for our wedding anniversary. Over the years we have been pretty lucky with wildlife sightings - we once saw the big 5 on our first day! This weekend was another story. We didn’t spot any big cats - disappointing as seeing leopard in particular is always magical. Had we fixated on what we “should” have seen, our disappointment could have ruined the whole weekend. We would have missed experiencing other unexpected little joys like this tiny tiny (size of my thumb) baby bird. I wrote this post reflecting on the difference between expectations and living with a sense or expectancy …escaping the tyranny of our ‘shoulds’ and our attachment to particular outcomes. https://link.medium.com/O0U76WQRVlb #nonattachment #bepresent #tinywow #expectancy #complexityfitness
2 years ago
View on Instagram |
6/6

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